What’s Fishin’ In Oregon (6-30-11)

I’ve got my fishing plans firmed up for the Fourth — how about you folks?

If not, take a look at the latest weekly Recreation Report posted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, or read on for highlights brazenly ripped off here:

SOUTHWEST ZONE

  • Warmer weather and weed growth has slowed fishing on many area ponds and lakes, but local streams are kicking out some nice cutthroat trout. Anglers should check fishing regulations for a particular waterbody before heading out.
  • The selective ocean coho season opens on Saturday.
  • Fishing has been picking up on Diamond Lake.
  • Spring chinook fishing continues to be good on the upper Rogue River.

NORTHWEST ZONE

  • Siletz River: Steelhead fishing is good with fish being caught throughout the main stem. Good numbers of summer steelhead typically return through July. Cutthroat trout season is open as well and can be very good using lighter tackle.
  • Tillamook Bay: Spring chinook fishing is dropping off, although many fish have moved to upstream areas. Trolling spinners or herring should still produce some bites. A few sturgeon are still being caught. Try the upper bay and Tillamook River tidewater for the best opportunity this time of year.
  • Trask River: Fishing for steelhead is slow, but a few summer steelhead are showing up. Fishing is fair to good for spring chinook. Fish are being caught in tidewater and in the river up to and above the hatchery.  Bobber fishing baits has been the most productive. The popular fishing hole at Trask Hatchery closes to angling after June 30. The success of the fishery in the hatchery hole depends on anglers using good judgment when fishing for concentrated salmon. Avoid techniques that increase the likelihood of snagging or foul-hooking fish, and please pack out your trash. Angling for cutthroat is fair to good. Small spinners or flies work well. The north, south and east forks are now closed to angling.

WILLAMETTE ZONE

  • With warming water temperatures, the holiday weekend should offer good fishing opportunity for springers and summer steelhead on the Clackamas River.
  • Detroit and Henry Hagg lakes have been chosen as venues for Cabela’s and the Outdoor Channel’s “Wanna Fish for Millions” promotion, which runs through July 14. Large trout and bass have been tagged with spaghetti tags that could be worth up to $2 million to the angler lucky enough to catch one. Anglers have to be registered at Cabela’s website to participate.
  • Summer steelhead and spring chinook have entered the Santiam basin and will be the main focus of anglers for the next several weeks.
  • Warmer weather and recent trout stocking should make for some excellent family fishing on lakes, ponds and streams throughout the zone. Read on to find a fishing hole near you.

CENTRAL ZONE

  • Several of the Central Oregon lakes are accessible, stocked and providing great trout fishing.

NOBODY KNOWS THAT THE TROUT ARE BITING AT DIAMOND LAKE BETTER THAN RON PYLLKI OF MEDFORD WHO WON LAST WEEKEND'S BLACKBIRD DERBY TOP PRIZE OF $1,000 WITH THIS 5.7-POUNDER. ACCORDING TO DIAMOND LAKE RESORT, WHICH FORWARDED THE IMAGE, RON CAUGHT IT ON AN UNSPECIFIED FLY. THE RESORT REPORTS THAT EMERGERS, BUGGERS AND LEECHES ARE WORKING AND THAT FISHING IN THE SOUTH END IS "VERY GOOD." ELSEWHERE TROUT ARE BITING DOUGH BAIT, FLATFISH, NEEDLEFISH AND GANG TROLLS. (DIAMOND LAKE RESORT)

SOUTHEAST ZONE

  • STOCKING NOTE: Campbell, Deadhorse and Fourmile lakes will not be stocked before the Fourth of July holiday due to snow depth. They will be stocked as soon as they become accessible.
  • Crappie fishing has been picking up on several area reservoirs including Owyhee, Brownlee, Gerber and Hells Canyon.
  • Access is now available for most desert Reservoirs. Angling for rainbow trout has been good at Duncan, Holbrook, Lofton, Thief Valley and Wolf Creek reservoirs, and at Lake of the Woods.

 NORTHEAST ZONE

  • The Jubilee Lake youth angling event scheduled for July 2, has been rescheduled to July 17 due to heavy snow pack and limited access.
  • Chinook fishing season has opened on Lookingglass Creek. Over 220 hatchery adults have been caught at the weir as of June 27.
  • Spring chinook also is open on the Snake River below Hells Canyon Dam.

BROWNLEE ZONE

  • Crappie fishing has picked up and is good if you find a school.  The crappie are fairly large this year, with many over 12 inches. They are currently 15-30 deep, but are expected to spawn in the next few weeks so fishihng may get better. Use white or chartruese jigs with a crappie nibble. Catfish angling is picking up as well. Bass fishing is good. Call Idaho Power Company’s recording at 1-800-422-3143 to get information on access at recreational sites or visit their website http://www.idahopower.com/OurEnvironment/WaterInformation/Reservoir/

COLUMBIA ZONE

  • Salmon catch rates ranged from fair to excellent on the lower Columbia this past weekend.  Boat anglers fishing in the estuary averaged 1.14 summer chinook caught per boat, while anglers fishing in the gorge averaged 0.91 summer chinook caught per boat.  Boat anglers fishing in the Portland to Longview area averaged 0.22 summer chinook caught per boat, while anglers fishing in Troutdale this past week averaged 0.11 summer chinook caught per boat.  Angler success continues to improve along the banks between Portland and the estuary where catch rates averaged 0.15 summer chinook caught per bank angler.  On the lower Columbia this past weekend there were 464 boats, and 535 Oregon bank anglers counted on Saturday’s (6/25) flight.  Shad angling slowed down slightly this past week; however, the best catch rates continue to be in the gorge.

MARINE ZONE

  • Anglers out of Astoria landed one ocean-caught chinook for every two anglers and two out of every 10 anglers landed a coho. (Coho fishing opened June 26 off the Columbia River.) But for the rest of the coast ocean-caught salmon are still few and far between. Fishing for fin-clipped coho opens July 2 off the central coast.
  • Last week private and charter boats alike returned with good catches of rockfish but lingcod were harder to come by. The catch for lingcod was down to one fish for every 10 anglers in most ports.
  • Last week halibut fishers had an additional three days to the all-depth sport halibut fishery off the central Oregon coast. This week fisheries managers will meet to decide if there is sufficient quota remaining for the spring all-depth season for the central coast area to continue. The area – from Cape Falcon (30 miles south of the Columbia River) to Humbug Mountain (south of Port Orford) – opened May 12 on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays only. It could have closed as early as June 11 if the 115,578-pound quota had been taken. The fishery may continue on one or more of the following days: July 7-9 and 21-23, until the quota is met. For landing estimates.
  • The next minus tide series begins early in the morning June 28 and continues through July 6.
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