Columbia Fishing Report

Well … you’d expect a few more springers to turn up in the catch, but the latest from ODFW shows that anglers checked in the Lower Columbia weren’t landing much.

Better bets, courtesy of Jimmy Watts:

* Sturgeon angling is excellent for boat anglers in the Bonneville Pool.
* Counting fish released, steelhead fishing is excellent in The Dalles Pool and good in the John Day Pool for boat anglers.  Bank anglers are also catching a few fish.
* Walleye fishing is excellent in The Dalles Pool and good in the John Day Pool for boat anglers.

Here’s the rest of Watts’ weekly report for ODFW

SALMON STEELHEAD

COLUMBIA RIVER MAINSTEM, Bonneville Dam to the Oregon/Washington Border:  Under permanent regulations this section of the Columbia River is open January 1-March 31, 2010 to the retention of adipose fin-clipped steelhead with a daily bag limit of two fish. The retention of spring chinook is prohibited.  Modifications to the 2010 spring chinook fishery will be considered at the February 18th Compact hearing.

Steelhead anglers did well in both The Dalles and John Day pools last week.  Many anglers are plying the water on the lower Columbia in anticipation of the arrival of the 2010 spring chinook run, but success was very limited last week.

Gorge Bank & Boat:

No report.

Troutdale Boats:

No report.

Portland to Longview Bank & Boat:

Weekly checking showed no catch for 36 bank anglers and no catch for 30 boats (69 anglers).

Estuary Boat (Above Tongue Point):

No report.

Bonneville Pool:

No report.

The Dalles Pool:

Weekly checking showed three adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept plus two adipose fin-clipped steelhead and 12 unclipped steelhead released for six boats (11 anglers); and one adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept for four bank anglers.

John Day Pool (Columbia River above John Day Dam and John Day Arm):

Weekly checking showed one adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept plus two unclipped steelhead released for three boats (five anglers); and one unclipped steelhead released for 14 bank anglers.

STURGEON:

Effective January 1-April 30, 2010 the lower Columbia River from Buoy 10 to the Wauna power lines is open to the retention of white sturgeon seven days per week with a daily limit of one fish between 38 and 54 inches (fork length) and an annual limit of five sturgeon.

The Columbia River between Wauna power lines and Bonneville Dam is open to the retention of white sturgeon three days per week (Thursday, Friday, and Saturday) during January 1-July 31 with a daily limit of one sturgeon between 38 and 54 inches (fork length) and an annual limit of five sturgeon.

The Columbia River from Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam is open to the retention of sturgeon seven days per week with a daily limit of one sturgeon between 38-54 inches (fork length) and an annual limit of five sturgeon. Effective 12:01 AM Sunday February 21, 2010 the retention of sturgeon in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam upstream to The Dalles Dam will be prohibited because the catch guideline of 1,400 fish is projected to be reached.

The Columbia River between The Dalles Dam and McNary Dam (The Dalles Pool and John Day Pool) is open for the retention of sturgeon seven days per week with a daily limit of one sturgeon between 41 and 54 inches (fork length) and an annual limit of five fish until the respective guidelines of 300 and 165 fish are reached.

As of February 1, 2010, the cumulative surgeon catch was 390 fish in the Bonneville Pool, 87 fish in The Dalles Pool, and 41 fish in the John Day Pool.  Catch rates really jumped in the Bonneville Pool during the first two weeks of February. Sturgeon angling on the lower Columbia is very slow.  During January 2010, sturgeon anglers on the lower Columbia made 1,700 trips and kept 25 white sturgeon.

Gorge Bank:

No catch for two bank anglers. Effort has been very light.

Gorge Boats:

No report. Effort has been very light.

Troutdale Boats:

No report.

Portland to Longview Bank:

No report.

Portland to Longview Boats:

Weekly checking showed 15 sublegal sturgeon released for 11 boats (36 anglers).

Bonneville Pool Boat and Bank:

Weekly checking showed four legal white sturgeon kept, plus one legal, one oversize, and 43 sublegal sturgeon released for 62 bank anglers; and 35 legal white sturgeon kept, plus six legal, 297 sublegal, and one oversize sturgeon released for 22 boats (60 anglers).

The Dalles Pool Boat and Bank:

Weekly checking showed two sublegal sturgeon released for 40 bank anglers; and 37 sublegal sturgeon released for 11 boats (24 anglers).

John Day Boat and Bank:

Weekly checking showed no catch for 25 bank anglers; and three legal white sturgeon kept, plus three oversize and 28 sublegal sturgeon released for 34 boats (66 anglers).

WALLEYE:

Bonneville Pool Boats:

Weekly checking showed no catch for one boat (one angler).

The Dalles Pool Boats:

Weekly checking showed one walleye kept for four bank anglers and 16 walleye kept for four boats (eight anglers).

John Day Pool Boats:

Weekly checking showed 16 walleye kept for 17 boats (41 anglers).

New Law Targets Feral Swine
ODFW biologists believe it is still possible to eradicate Oregon’s population of feral swine before the population gets out of control and wildlife habitat and agricultural crops are laid waste. To put some teeth in the fight, the 2009 Legislature passed a law that prohibits the sale of feral swine hunts and requires land managers to report and remove feral swine from their property.New rules adopted at the January meeting of the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission give land managers 10 days after discovering feral swine on their property to contact ODFW and 60 days to work with the agency on a removal plan that includes a timeline.

“Landowners should contact their local wildlife biologist if they suspect they have feral swine on their property,” said Larry Cooper, Deputy Administrator of ODFW’s Wildlife Division. “We can help them with a removal plan and technical advice.”

Feral swine rooting
Feral swine can “rototill” a hillside in a night, destroying crops, pastureland and stream banks.
Photo courtesy of ODFW

It is legal to hunt feral swine, but opportunities are limited because most of the feral swine identified to date have been on private land, which requires landowner permission. On public lands, swine can be hunted with a valid hunting license. There is no limit or tag required, but on public property all hunting regulations must be followed.

Feral swine are free-roaming pigs, that is, they are not being held under domestic confinement. They are responsible for damage to habitat and depredation of livestock and wildlife as well as disease transmission to wildlife, livestock and humans. Read the Feral Swine Action Plan for Oregon on the Oregon Invasive Species Web site. For information on hunting feral swine .

2 Responses to “Columbia Fishing Report”

  1. don starkin Says:

    pls advise where The Dalles Pool is

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